Classic Properties REALTORS ®



Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 12/29/2019

Photo by Clint Patterson via Unsplash

It sounds like a great idea -- turn off your electricity entirely when you go on vacation and you'll dramatically slash your electric bills. While this works in theory, there are some considerations that make shutting everything down problematic for homeowners. Learning more about your options allows you to conserve energy wisely, without running into problems when you get home. Here's what you need to know about conserving power when you travel.

What to turn off -- and what to leave on when you travel:

  • HVAC System: One of the top consumers of energy in your home, reducing HVAC use while you are away will save you money. According to Duke Energy any savings you get from turning your HVAC off entirely could be reversed when you get home and have to power your entire system back up again. It will have to work extra hard to get your whole home back to a comfortable temperature. Instead of turning this off, set your system to vacation mode (most programmable thermostats have one) or to a temperature that makes your HVAC work less. You won't be home, so it does not have to be crisp and cool-- setting your thermostat to 80 can help you save money and not require an energy-consuming reboot when you get home. 
  • Hot water heater: You don't need to heat water while you are not home. Turn the temperature down or turn the unit off entirely at the fusebox, then simply turn back on or up when you get home. 
  • Fridge and Freezer: If you have any food stored at all (and most of us do) these need to stay on. If either component is empty or contains items that won't go bad (like bottled water or beverages) you can turn that component to a warmer setting to save while you are away. 
  • Water: Turning the water off can help conserve power and more importantly, prevent flooding. 
  • Electronics: If it plugs in, it consumes power, whether you are using it or not. Unplug electronics like the TV, kitchen helpers and more to cut your costs while you are away. 
  • Lights: A totally dark house lets would-be burglars know you are not home. Unplug most lamps, but leave a few on timers to boost your home security as you save. 

Learning which components of your home are essential for security and comfort -- and which can be turned off entirely -- allows you to cut your costs while you are not home. Once you return home from your vacation, you can get things going again quickly and without much downtime. 





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 12/22/2019

Although a home seller wants to enjoy a quick, seamless home selling experience, problems sometimes can arise along the way. And if a home seller is not careful, these issues may cause him or her to encounter one of the dreaded home selling worst-case scenarios.

Ultimately, there are many home selling worst-case scenarios that a seller should try to avoid at all costs, and these scenarios include:

1. A home is priced too high.

A home seller should establish a competitive price for his or her residence from the get-go. Because failure to do so could force a residence to linger on the housing market for weeks, months or years.

To determine a competitive price, it helps to conduct plenty of real estate market research. Looking at the prices of recently sold houses in your city or town can help you determine whether you're preparing to enter a buyer's or seller's market. Also, examining the prices of comparable houses in your area can help you narrow your price range.

Furthermore, a property appraisal is a viable option for all home sellers, at all times. During an appraisal, a home expert will assess your residence and provide a property valuation. Then, you can use the property valuation to price your home accordingly.

2. A homebuyer requests a price reduction or major repairs after an inspection.

A home inspection generally takes place a few days after a seller accepts a buyer's offer on a residence. If this inspection reveals a wide array of home problems, it could jeopardize a potential sale.

It often helps to complete a home inspection before listing a residence. This inspection allows a seller to identify any home problems and resolve these issues immediately.

In addition, a home seller should understand his or her options after an inspection that reveals myriad home problems.

If a buyer requests a price reduction or home repairs after an inspection, a seller can agree to the buyer's terms or counter a buyer's proposal. Or, if a seller feels a buyer is being unreasonable, he or she can walk away from a home sale and relist his or her residence.

3. A home seller hires a real estate agent who lacks comprehensive industry experience.

If a seller hires a real estate agent who lacks comprehensive industry experience, he or she risks a long, arduous home selling experience.

There is no need to hire an inexperienced real estate agent. In fact, dozens of top-notch real estate agents are available nationwide, and these housing market professionals can help you achieve your home selling goals in no time at all.

The ideal real estate agent will know the ins and outs of the housing market. Plus, he or she will be able to guide you along each stage of the home selling journey and do whatever it takes to promote your residence to the right groups of buyers.

Enjoy a fast, profitable and worry-free home selling experience – consider the aforementioned home selling worst-case scenarios, and you can minimize risk throughout the home selling journey.





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 12/20/2019

This Commercial in Uxbridge, MA recently sold for $130,000. This style home was sold by - Classic Properties REALTORS ®.


288 N. Main Street, Uxbridge, MA 01569

Commercial

$149,900
Price
$130,000
Sale Price

1
Buildings
Commercial
Type of Comm.
7,405.00
Lot Size
Great exposure with this location on Route 122 with parking. Perfect for retail or office space. 888 square feet on the first floor with a walk out basement that perfect for storage located on 7405 square foot lot with parking in front and in the rear. Town water and sewer. Less 5 miles to Route 146 & about a mile to Route 16 and downtown Uxbridge. Traffic count is around 11,000 per day. Offered at below assessed value.






Tags: Real estate   01569   Uxbridge   Commercial  
Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 12/15/2019

New windows can work wonders for a house. Depending on how old your windows are, replacements can make your home less drafty, and much quieter, but they can also spruce up a room that’s starting to look dated.

When you replace your windows you also might see a drop in your heating bill. However, the cost of replacing windows is steeper than you’re ever likely to save on heat. So, if you’re thinking of replacing your windows just to save cash, in the long run there might be better ways of doing so.

In this article, we’re going to talk about choosing replacement windows for your home. We’ll walk you through the different types of windows so you can find the type that fits your needs. Read on for our replacement windows buyer’s guide.

Choosing the right window style

There are endless types of windows that you could find in a given home. However, four main styles are what we normally think of when talking about replacement windows.

Single vs double-hung windows

First, there are single and double-hung windows. In double-hung windows, both the top and bottom sash are operable, or able to be opened. Being able to utilize both sashes is beneficial for airflow. Opening the top sash will allow the warm air escape, opening the bottom sash will allow cool air to enter.

In single-hung windows, only the lower sash is able to be opened and closed. But otherwise, they are very similar to double-hung windows.

Both of these types of windows come in variants that allow you to pivot the sashes inward to clean the exterior glass. However, if you buy single-hung windows you’ll only be able to wash the lower sash. Keep that in mind if you’re buying windows for a second floor or attic window.

Sliding windows

Sliding windows are those which move horizontally on their tracks. They produce good ventilation and are easy to use. However, just like single-hung and double hung windows, they do slightly obstruct your view at the midpoint when closed. The rectangular shape of sliding windows, however, means you won’t likely be able to install an air conditioner.

Casement style windows

The last main type of window we’ll talk about are casement style windows. This type of window operates on a hinge like a door would. When they’re fully opened, they produce good ventilation. When they’re fully closed, they don’t obstruct the view at all.

However, just like with sliding windows, you won’t be able to install an AC unit. Furthermore, this type of window is more prone to malfunction due to the crank and hinge system, and cranking it open and closed all the time could be a minor annoyance for some homeowners.

Frame materials

Window frames come in four main materials--vinyl, wood, clad-wood, and aluminum.

  • Vinyl is the most common. They look clean and modern, and they also resist heat and condensation making them easy to maintain.

  • Wood frames are regaining popularity. Since they often come unfinished, you can easily customize them to your home.

  • Clad-wood frames are wood on the interior and aluminum on the exterior, making them rugged and resistant to weathering and rot.

  • Aluminum windows are economical, lightweight, and easy to maintain.


Now that you know a bit more about windows, you’ll be better equipped to decide what type of replacements to purchase for your home.





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 12/8/2019

Photo by Michal Jarmoluk via Pixabay

Home décor and styles change all the time. One of the main things to remember before getting ready to completely remodel is choosing the right contractor. Although there are many contractors in the area, making sure they are able to do the job correctly makes all the difference. What are some things you should be looking for?

  • Recommendations

Getting input from friends and family, or a reputable association of contractors can help you create a list of contractors that could handle your project.

  • Interview

Once you have your list, it’s time to interview those contractors. Ask the following questions: Can you handle a project of this magnitude? Do you have samples of your work? Can I speak to previous clients? Do you use subcontractors? Are you licensed? Do you have insurance? This step can help you narrow the list even further and decide who you want to meet in person.

  • Meet the contractors

Once you’ve established who made the cut, it’s time to have a face-to-face meeting. It’s during this meeting where you will determine whether they are a good fit. They should be able to answer any questions you have with ease, provide their licenses, and start to formulate a quote.

  • Do your homework

Call the references the contractors have given you. Did the contractor ask to see the blueprint when you had your meeting? If they didn’t, they aren’t your ideal contractor. A quote can’t be made if they don’t know what they will be working on. Also, you want to discard the lowball quote. Quality work isn’t cheap.

  • Discuss the project and finances

Once you’ve selected the final contractor and agreed upon the estimate, it’s time to find out how their billing structure is set up. You should never pay a contractor all the money up front. Even with glowing reviews, contractors can slip up. Don’t put yourself in that position.

  • Timelines and agreements

The contractor should be able to provide a firm timeline on what will happen and how long the project will take. Everything you two agree on should be outlined in the contract from the very beginning. This protects your interests. The contract should detail every element of the project, from payment schedules to materials being used. The agreement should include proof of liability insurance, as well. You should require lien releases from the contractor to protect you from subcontractors and suppliers that may go after them if they don’t pay their bills. If there are any changes, it must be outlined in the agreement.

Following these steps should help you choose the right contractor and get the home of your dreams.




Categories: Home improvement