Classic Properties REALTORS ®



Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 3/3/2019

If you’re like many families, you never seem to have quite enough space for each family member to spread out. To stay within your budget, or maybe to create a more close-knit family you have two or more children sharing a room. As time goes on sharing personal space can create rifts between siblings. To avoid added stress and tension consider employing some shared space solutions to help your family members establish their own space, even in a shared room. Here are some divided ideas to get you started.

Mirroring setup – A simple solution is to just split the room right down the middle. Create mirroring layouts on either side of a shared dresser or desk-space and allow each child to spread out on their half. 

Curtain Wall — You can also divide the room with an actual curtain or screen. A weighted curtain hanging through the center serves as a visual barrier and helps create a sound barrier as well.

Lofted bed — Purchase a pair of lofted beds with built-in desk space underneath. Each child can build out their area and have a place to go that is entirely their own. As children age, you can even install curtains across the bottom of the loft to give them more privacy. 

Divide the closet — Children commonly fight about a sibling's belongings finding their way into their space. This issue is especially true when it comes to closet space. Make sure you establish a separation of closet and storage space (and bathroom if they're sharing one) to help your kids protect their belongings and feel that their stuff is indeed theirs. 

Wireless Headphones — Without purchasing furniture or shelving, you can give your kids a sense of personal space by merely providing them with a way to block out the activities of other family members. Get each of your children a pair of wireless headphones so they can enjoy their music, audio-book or phone entertainment without disturbing each other.

Hold Children Accountable for their space. Separately. — Your daughters might share a room, but both may not be equally at fault for the clutter or lack of cleanliness. A benefit of delineating a separation between their spaces is that it helps you see what each of them is doing, individually. Hold the messy child responsible for their half of the room and positively reinforce the child who is completing their chores. 

Though they might think it so, children to do not need their own rooms to be happy. Learning to share smaller spaces can help your family grow closer. You have to learn more about each other, pay attention to preferences and pet peeves and generally learn to give and take on a more regular basis. Start your kids on the right path to personal growth and family unity by establishing their individual areas and responsibility versus shared family space.




Tags: bedroom   children   family home  
Categories: children   bedroom   family home  


Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 9/30/2018

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Playrooms are usually the bane of a parent’s existence. The neverending stream of toys from holidays and celebrations coupled with a child’s lack of natural orderliness do not an organized room make. If you’re determined to end the clean up time struggle and find a solution that works keep reading.

For starters, forget the typical toy box solution.


Toyboxes only force children into creating a mess as they dig through its contents pulling toys out as they go to find the one they are looking for. Instead, opt for bins and/or baskets to corral your children’s toys by category. This way legos have their own container and Barbie has hers.


Want to really keep a tidy playroom?


Put a cap on the amounts of toys your child owns to avoid overwhelm and minimal clean up time. Your child will be better able to manage their toys as well as enjoy them more. Don’t worry you don’t actually have to throw out all of their toys.


A great solution that also adds renewed interest in old toys is to keep most of your child’s belongings in storage. You can then swap out their available selection throughout the year to keep their interest piqued without cluttering up the playroom.


Avoid moving the madness to your attic or basement by also regularly cleaning out existing toys to make room for the influx of the new during the holidays and birthday seasons.


Give your child responsibility.


Teach your child responsibility for their toys by having them clean up their own messes. Create routines throughout the day to help them learn how to clean up before they move on to their next activity. This could mean cleaning up before lunch and bedtime or even before moving on to a different toy.


Make cleanup a breeze for your child.


Keep all storage within reach so your child can not only easily access their toys but also easily clean them up on their own. You can do this by keeping like items with like and storing items in clear containers that are well labeled. If your child isn’t old enough to read, create labels that have simple images that indicate what type of toy belongs inside each container.


Customize your storage solutions to your child. Review what works and what doesn’t often and make changes accordingly. By creating a process that evolves with your child as learn new habits and even grow older you can guarantee a solution that sticks throughout their childhood.


Hopefully, you’ve gained a few ideas on how you can improve your child’s playroom to not only be better organized but also stay better organized. With some patience and modeling good organization behavior, your child will be keeping their playroom neat and tidy without a fight. Happy organizing!