Classic Properties REALTORS ®



Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 1/6/2019

If you live in one state, but are trying to buy a home in another state, you’ll face some obvious challenges. There’s certain steps that you can take to help you get through the home buying process in another state. Whether you’re buying a vacation home, or are in a complete transition, you’ll need to follow a few steps to make life easier for you. 


Know How Much Time You Have


First, you’ll need to ask yourself when you’re planning to move. If you have flexibility and are planning a trip to the new state before you need to move, that paints a much different picture than a more rushed move. Consider:


  • The time it will take to sell your current home
  • When the closing will be on the new home


Keep that timeline in mind.


You’ll definitely want to hire a realtor to handle everything for you on both ends when you’re in this situation. A Realtor’s knowledge and experience is definitely worth it to help you.


Get Your Finances In Order


You’ll need to apply for a loan on the home you’re buying in the new state. You should start by getting pre-approved for a mortgage in that state. You don’t want all of your important paperwork to be buried in the midst of packing and moving. Also, you’ll need to have that loan secured before you even head to the new state to close on the home. Everything should be in order. This situation may be more challenging for you than a typical home purchase. Since big purchases affect your credit score, you’ll need to hold off on buying a car, furniture, or any major appliances that you may need. 


Get As Much Information As You Can


As a buyer who is from out of state, you’ll need to do your homework. Maybe you have visited the state many times before. Perhaps you know nothing about it. The more you know ahead of time, the easier that your transition will be. You’ll need to find recommendations about which neighborhood to search in. You’ll also want to learn a bit more about the lifestyle the area provides for activities like dining, entertainment, and recreation. You can learn a lot in the internet, but talking to locals- even a local realtor- can help you to find the right spot to live in. 


Find The Right Realtors


You’ll need to find the right realtors in both your home state and the state that you’re moving to. The seller’s agent will assist you in getting your old home sold. From marketing the listing to home showings to sending you all of the paperwork that you’ll need to sign, a seller’s agent is very valuable to someone who needs to move out of one state and into another. 


The buyer’s agent can help you in your new state, communicating with you on new listings and advising you on the neighborhoods that you’ll be the most happy in. Hiring these two realtors may be one of the most important steps in your feat of moving across two different states.


With the resources that are available online, moving from state-to-state isn't as hard as it may seem. Do your research for a smooth transition. Happy moving!





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 12/9/2018

Selling a home for the first time can be tricky. In fact, first-time home sellers often make mistakes that prolong the home selling process. Perhaps even worse, these errors may cause a home seller to miss out on opportunities to optimize the value of his or her residence.

Now, let's take a look at three common mistakes that first-time home sellers make, as well as ways to avoid these problems.

1. Setting an Unrealistic Initial Asking Price

Although you might have paid a hefty sum for your house a few years ago, what your home was worth then is unlikely to match its current value. However, if you set an unrealistic initial asking price for your residence, you risk alienating dozens of potential buyers.

Before you set a price for your house, it pays to perform plenty of housing market research. That way, you can see how your home stacks up against the competition and price it based on the current real estate sector's conditions.

Furthermore, you may want to conduct a home appraisal prior to listing your house. Following a home appraisal, you'll receive a property valuation to help you establish a competitive price for your residence.

2. Failing to Provide Full Details About Your House

No home is perfect, and a home seller who withholds information about his or her residence risks wasting precious time and resources. To better understand why this may be the case, let's consider an example.

If a home seller fails to include information about a faulty heating and cooling system in a home listing, a buyer will be unaware of the problem. A buyer then may submit an offer on this house that a seller accepts. But during a home inspection, a property inspector likely will discover the defective heating and cooling system, which leads the buyer to rescind his or her offer. And at this point, the seller will have to restart the home selling process from square one.

When it comes to selling a home, it helps to be honest. If you provide full details about your residence, you can help a buyer make an informed decision and reduce the risk of that a purchase agreement will fall apart after a home inspection.

3. Choosing an Ineffective Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent should have a seller's best interests in mind. As such, this housing market professional will collaborate with a seller throughout the home selling journey to ensure a seller can optimize his or her earnings.

Unfortunately, not all real estate agents possess the same skills. But if you evaluate a variety of real estate agents, you can increase the likelihood of finding one who matches or exceeds your expectations.

Employ a real estate agent with a proven reputation. And if you're uncertain about whether a real estate agent can help you achieve your home selling goals, it usually helps to request client referrals from this housing market professional.

Streamline the process of selling your home – avoid the aforementioned first-time home seller mistakes, and you can boost your chances of enjoying a quick, profitable home selling experience.





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 10/21/2018

If you want to streamline the home selling journey, it usually is a good idea to develop goals. That way, you can identify any potential home selling challenges and address them before you list your residence.

Ultimately, there are many problems that may arise during the home selling journey, and these include:

1. Poor Curb Appeal

How your home looks to buyers is key. If your residence fails to impress buyers when they see it for the first time, these individuals are unlikely to schedule a house showing. As a result, your home may linger on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

Devote time and energy to improve your house's curb appeal – you will be happy you did. By mowing the lawn, removing dirt and debris from exterior walkways and performing other home exterior upgrades, you can make your home an attractive option to buyers. You may even differentiate your residence from the competition – something that may lead to a successful home selling experience.

2. Cluttered Interior

If your home is full of personal belongings, you may want to remove some of these items. By doing so, you can show buyers the full potential of your residence.

For those who want to cut down on clutter, there are many options. Oftentimes, it helps to rent a storage unit that allows you to keep your belongings safe until your residence sells. On the other hand, if you want to get rid of excess items, you can host a yard sale, list your items online or give these items to family members, friends or local charities.

3. Exorbitant Home Price

An exorbitant initial home asking price may be an instant turn-off for buyers. Fortunately, if you analyze the local housing market and your residence, you can establish a competitive initial asking price for your home.

Evaluate the prices of available homes in your area that are similar to your own. Also, you may want to conduct a house appraisal and review an appraisal report. With this information at your disposal, you can price your house competitively.

As you get set to enter the housing market, you may want to employ a real estate agent, too. This housing market professional will help you establish realistic home selling goals, as well as determine the best steps to help you achieve your aspirations.

A real estate agent is committed to a home seller's success, and he or she will do what it takes to help you thrive. If you want to sell your residence as quickly as possible, for instance, a real estate agent can help you do just that. Or, if you want to optimize your house sale earnings, a real estate agent will ensure you can get the best price for your home.

Ready to add your home to the real estate market? Develop home selling goals, and you may be better equipped than ever before to enjoy a fast, profitable house selling experience.





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 9/9/2018

After years in your current residence, you're ready for a change. As such, you've decided to add your home to the real estate market in the hopes of moving on to bigger and better things. Selling a home can be a daunting task, particularly for first-time sellers. Fortunately, we're here to help you maximize the value of your home and accelerate the home selling process. Here are three tips that will ensure you can become an informed first-time home seller: 1. Stay the Course. Although you may expect immediate interest in your residence, it may take some time for interest in your home to pick up. However, a patient, dedicated home seller knows how to stay the course and remain calm, cool and collected throughout the home selling process. For instance, a home seller may add his or her residence to the real estate market and continue to share the online home listing with friends, family members and colleagues. By doing so, this home seller may be able to stir up interest in his or her residence over an extended period of time. It also is important to remember that Rome wasn't built in a day, and much in the same vein, the first offer you receive on your residence might not be the best one. As a result, you should only accept an offer that makes you feel comfortable, i.e. an offer that meets your expectations. 2. Don't Sweat the Small Stuff. After you accept an offer from a homebuyer, the buyer likely will want to set up a home inspection. And if he or she encounters unforeseen problems with your home, problems could arise that may slow down the home selling process. If a homebuyer notices substantial issues with your home, he or she may rescind an offer or ask that these problems be resolved. Furthermore, home repairs can be costly, which means you may be forced to invest in expensive home improvements or risk missing out on an opportunity to sell your home. As a home seller, you may encounter obstacles as you attempt to sell your home. But when difficulties arise, try to focus on what's important – selling your home, maximizing its value and ensuring both you and the homebuyer are satisfied with the end results. A home seller who lets minor issues cause his or her blood pressure to rise may put a home sale in danger. Therefore, if you feel stressed, take a deep breath and try to work with a homebuyer to find a resolution that fits both sides. 3. Employ a Real Estate Agent. The home selling journey often is filled with twists and curves along the way. But with a real estate agent at your side, you'll be able to overcome any pitfalls immediately. Your real estate agent can promote and showcase your residence to prospective homebuyers. This professional also will provide expert tips, enabling you to streamline the process of selling your house. Remove the guesswork from the home selling journey – become an informed first-time home seller, and you can speed up the process of generating interest in your house.





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 6/17/2018

Selling a home takes patience. Especially when you’re balancing your time between settling into your new home, and keeping up with your work and family life. So, when you’ve finally gotten to the point of accepting an offer on your home, you’ll probably breathe a sigh of relief--and you should!  However, there are still a few more things that will need to happen and a couple of things to consider before closing the deal on your home sale.

Contingencies on the purchase contract

A purchase contract typically includes contingency clauses that are designed to protect the interests of both the buyer and the seller. These clauses mean that the contract is contingent upon the actions being completed before it can be legally valid.

There are three main contingencies that will likely be included in the purchase contract before closing--inspection, financing, and appraisal.

Inspection contingency

The inspection contingency allows the buyer to have the home inspected by a professional before closing (the time should be specified within the contract, but the inspection should usually occur no more than two weeks after you accept the offer). A home inspection lets the buyer know what to expect in terms of repairs that the home needs now or will need in the near future.

Financing contingency

Since the vast majority of buyers will be purchasing their home through a loan, a financing contingency is included to allow the buyer time to secure their mortgage. Getting pre-qualified and pre-approved makes this process easier, but the buyer will still have to finalize and close on their mortgage before their financing is official.

This clause exists to protect the buyer in the event that their mortgage application is denied, ensuring that they aren’t penalized.

Appraisal contingency

The third contingency most often found in purchase contracts is a home appraisal. The buyer will order an appraisal and then the appraiser will reach out to you to find a day to come and value your home.

If the home is then appraised at the amount agreed upon in your contract, this contingency is met. However, if the appraisal comes up lower than the purchase amount, the buyer can renegotiate the price.

Walkthrough and closing

Once the appraisal and inspection have been met and financing secured, the buyer will have a chance to do a final walkthrough of your home. The walkthrough usually occurs no more than two days prior to closing on the sale. A walkthrough allows the buyer view the home one last time to ensure that the condition of the home hasn’t drastically changed since the home was inspected or appraised. So, make sure the buyer is aware of any changes you planned to make to the home before closing.

Now you’re ready to close on your home sale. You’ll receive a disclosure form to review (read it carefully!) and sign. Once closing is complete, ownership of the home is officially transferred to the buyer.

While the closing process does include several steps, it’s important to be available and cooperative along the way to ensure a smooth sale and transition into your new home.