Classic Properties REALTORS ®



Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 5/17/2020

Image by Susan Lowry Hare from Pixabay

Adirondack chairs are popular on decks and for outdoor living, though they also look great in a rustic living room or cabin!  Rather than being straight-backed and uncomfortable, their design make them a joy to sit in.  However, a finished Adirondack chair can up to $700 dollars, whereas materials will run you between $50 and $150 depending on the wood you choose to use. Check out how to make your very own Adirondack chair by following the instructions below.

Note: you will need a miter saw and a jigsaw to complete this project.

Materials

Lumber

  • One 2" x 2" x 6' footboard
  • Three 2" x 4" x 8' footboards
  • Four 1" x 4" x 8' footboards
  • Hardware

  • 2-inch screws
  • 2-inch deck screws
  • 4-inch deck screws
  • 1 1/2-inch deck screws or exterior screws
  • Other

  • Wood glue
  • Directions

    A) Cutting the planks to size

    1. For the stretcher boards
      Cut two 2 x 4s such that the long end measures 31 7/8".  One end should be cut to 20o off of square at the shortest point; the other end should be cut to 35off square at the longest point. Then, mark off 2" on the 20o square end and cut at a right angle (90o) to your 20o cut. 

      If you aren't sure how to measure a certain number of degrees off of square, check out this quick how-to here
    2. For the legs
      Cut two, 2" x 4" planks to 20 3/4".  Cut both ends parallel, 15o off square.  These will be the back legs.  For the front legs, cut two, 2" x 4" planks to 20" long.
    3. For the seat
      Cut five, 1" x 4" planks to 22 1/2".
    4. For the arms of the chair:
      Cut two, 1" x 4" planks to 27".
    5. For the arm rest support:
      Cut two, 2" x 2" planks to 26 1/2".  Cut one end at 15o off square.
    6. For the back support and front apron:
      Cut two2" x 4" planks to 22 1/2".
    7. For the back slats:
      Cut five1" x 4" planks to 36".
    8. For the top support section:
      Cut one, 1" x 4" board to 19 1/2".
    9. For the base support section:
      Cut one2" x 4" board to 19 1/2".

    B) Building the legs

    1. Using 2 1/2" deck screws, attach both back and front legs to an arm support, keeping the outside and top edges even.  Use clamps and wood glue for additional stability.
    2. Turn the front leg such that the arm support faces downward on your bench, and elevate off the bench using 2x4s.  Measure 13 3/4" from the base of your front leg on the left-hand side, and mark.  On the same leg, measure 1/2" horizontally and mark.   Line up your stretcher such that the 20o off of square side lines up with your two marked measurements.  The 35off square side should now line up to the base on the right.  Fix in place with 2 1/2" deck screws.  Use wood glue for additional stability.
    3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make your second leg.
    4. Using 2 1/2" deck screws and wood glue, attach the front apron such that it lines up with the stretcher board on each side.

    C) Making the seat

    Drill two pilot holes on each side of your seat slats, using a countersink bit to keep the wood intact.  Line up on the top of the stretcher and screw into place using the 2" screws, being sure to put a 1/2" gap between each slat.  Do not use wood glue on the seat slats; they will naturally move more than the rest of the chair.
    Note: it helps to lay out all the slats first, screwing in the outermost slats before the others and adjusting as you go, so that the spacing is right.

    D) Making the back

    1. Turn the chair upright with the back towards you.  You will note that the back support board is wider than width of the legs to which it must be affixed.  Attach the back support to both of the back legs at an angle, such that the distal side is pointed upward and the proximal side is pointed downward until flush with both sides.  Use 2 1/2" deck screws and wood glue to affix.
    2. Attach the back slats as you did the seat slats in Part C: 1/2" apart, using 2" screws at the base but with 1 1/4" exterior screws at the top.  Do not use wood glue on the slats, as they will naturally need a bit more flexibility.  
      Note: it helps to lay out all the slats first, screwing in the outermost slats before the others and adjusting as you go, so that the spacing is right.
    3. Using a bucket, trash bin, or other large, circular item as a guide, draw an arc at the top of your back slats.  Then, using your jigsaw, make the cut.
    4. Slide the finished back into place in your chair.  Secure with 2 1/2" deck screws.  Finally, screw the chair back into the back support with 2" deck screws.

    Finishing touches

    1. Finish the chair by screwing the armrests into the arm supports using 2" deck screws and wood glue, clamping into place.  
    2. After all your glue has cured as per the instructions on your wood glue, sand any jagged edges, particularly the top of the chair back.
    3. Finally, paint or spray with at least two coats of finish: a clear coat if you really like the look of your wood.




    Categories: DIY  


    Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 1/26/2020


     Photo by Prawny via Pixabay

    Circa 1965, having beautiful wood paneling was the envy of the neighborhood. It was like bringing the outdoors in. But 50-60 years later, it usually just makes a room seem dark and dated unless you live in a log cabin. In most cases, you can remove the paneling and paint the drywall underneath. Here's what you'll do.

    What you'll need

    • Primer
    • Brushes
    • Paint rollers 
    • Painter's tape
    • Plastic floor protection
    • Paint pan
    • Putty knife
    • Spackling paste for nail holes
    • Safety goggles
    • Screwdriver
    • Flashlight
    • Pry bar
    • Hand sander

    Step one: make sure there's drywall under there

    Some home builders simply hung the panels directly onto the studs. Others hung drywall first. Then they nailed the paneling over it. Before you begin this project, you need to know what you have. 

    *Pro tip* Find out if you have drywall by removing the outlet and light switch covers. Then peer into the wall with your flashlight. You should be able to see the rough edges of drywall in there. If not, don't proceed unless you also want to hang the drywall. It's not that hard. But it's a two-person, multiple weekend job for the average DIYer. We want you to know what you're getting into. If this is more than you feel comfortable with, contact a professional.

    Step two: remove the paneling

    Put on your safety goggles. Insulation, nails or a piece of wood could go flying during this job.

    Next, use a pry bar to remove any molding or trim, carefully if you plan to reuse it. Now, you'll see the edges of the panel. Pry it off panel by panel. It will be nailed into the studs, so you'll need to put some upper body strength into it. Break boards to get it off the wall. But try to keep the drywall underneath as undamaged as possible.

    Step three: repair the drywall

    You'll definitely have nail holes to fill after removing the paneling. You may also have small gouges. They are easy to fix. And you'll need to do that to have a smooth painting surface.

    Apply spackle to the holes with your putty knife. Then allow them to dry before sanding the surface smooth. You may need a second coat. But know it doesn't have to be perfect. That's what primer is for.

    Step four: prime the wall

    Primer helps fill small imperfections and smooth the painting surface in preparation for painting the wall. Lay down your plastic and apply painter's tape where needed. Then roll your wall with primer. Use the paintbrush to get corners and crevices that a roller won't reach. 

    *Pro tip* If you take a break, put the end of your roller and paintbrush in a large freezer bag and seal it as well with tape or a rubber band. If the primer or paint dries on the brush, you may have to replace it. That's an extra expense you can avoid.

    Let the primer dry on the wall. Then use your flashlight to see if there are any thin spots. Apply more, as needed.

    And you're all ready to choose your paint color. Goodbye, paneling. Hello, 21st Century. For more home projects to update and improve your home, follow our blog.

     

     

     




    Categories: DIY  


    Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 6/30/2019

    Yes, prepping your home for sale seems like a lot of work, but its definitely worth it! Selling your home "as-is" can increase the time on the market and decrease the sale price. Depending on how much you can to invest, its possible to go all-out with the exterior design process but you can make great strides with just a few dollars in your pocket and a weekend to work on it.

    Your real estate professional can give you specific suggestions after viewing your property, but here are a few that help just about everyone:

    Start with the Garden

    First things first, clean up your yard and garden. Getting rid of those fall leaves you've neglected to pick up, and dead branches hanging on your trees and bushes makes a big difference. If you have a lawn, make certain it’s mown down to a practical level so that it always looks clean and cared for. If you have a xeriscape, make sure your ground coverings are spread evenly. Mulch, gravel, and rubber are all easy to rake back into place with standard gardening tools. A cared for landscape will draw in buyers, helping them fall in love with the vibe of your home.

    Add Some Color

    Adding some window boxes or planters with seasonal flowers can brighten up your home and make it more appealing to potential buyers. Be careful not to over-water them and clean up any old blooms to keep them looking fresh. Worried about the upkeep? You can simplify your gardening efforts by adding a drip-irrigation system. Not only are they automatic, but the EPA also says they save water and are more efficient than sprinkler systems.

    Be Visible

    A lot of buyers drive around their favorite neighborhoods looking for just the right home. Want to make sure they can find your property? Check to see just how visible your house number is. The easier it is for a home seeker to find you, the faster your property is likely to sell. If you have existing door numbers, try a metal polish to clean up brass or steel numbers or a new coat of paint for wooden or even plastic ones. If your home is missing digits, or they are hard to see from the street, check out your local home improvement and craft stores for larger or more decorative options.

    Do Some Painting (but just a little)

    It can be expensive to repaint your entire home, and that's not in every budget. It's okay! Start by just cleaning off your existing paint. Use a proper hose attachment or rent a power sprayer from your local home improvement store and see just how much brighter and more inviting your home is when the paint is clean. To add that extra something, consider repainting your door and window shutters with a matching or contrasting color. Just that little bit of fresh paint at the focal points can make your home much more inviting. Make sure you do a clean job though, paint on door handles and windows won't help your cause.

    Make it Bright

    If you have existing outdoor lighting, now's the time for some elbow grease. Make sure all your lights are clean of dust and grime, so they show at their best. Get some bright new bulbs for them to ensure none are burnt out. Need some extra appeal? Try adding lights along your driveway, walkway or to accent a specific part of your landscape like a tree, statue or fountain. Landscaping lights can be easy to set up, just look for solar-powered LED lights. Available in a variety of colors, with no batteries or cords required, just stick them where you want for a dramatic evening look.

    Your property may benefit from a couple weekends spent in the yard. Ask your real estate professional for specific advice about how to best show off your home.




    Categories: curb appeal   DIY   home selling  


    Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 4/21/2019

    If you’ve spent any time watching home shows over the last few seasons, you’ll have heard the term “shiplap” to describe a wall feature. But what is shiplap, and why is it a coveted wallcovering?

    Historic shiplap

    By definition, “shiplap” is lumber planking milled with a rabbeted joint along the length of the top and bottom horizontal-edges designed to fit together or "lap" for strength and stability. So, each board rests on the one below it, with a forward overlapping notch. Originally, shiplap’s overlapping design created a weather-tight surface along the grooves. Technically called “rabbeted,” these recesses or grooves milled along the edge of a piece of a plank of wood create the laps. When viewed as a cross-section, a rabbeted joint is two-sided so that the second plank overlapping the first joins both a parallel and a perpendicular face.

    So, was it used on ships? The easy answer is “yes” with the caveat that the boards also had pitch or glue to make them completely watertight. In its true architectural form, shiplap is an exterior siding material used to make a building weather-proof. As the wood weather or ages, the original tight joint forms a slight gap, giving aged shiplap its distinctive look.

    Modern shiplap

    On television and modern interior design applications, however, wood treatments identified as shiplap sometimes originated as wood planking—planks of wood with slight gaps between them used to “sheet” walls for other coverings. In the days before drywall, such sheeting commonly added to the wall's stability in preparation for lath and plaster or wallpaper. These planks may or may not have rabbeted joints, but yet, colloquially designers refer to them as shiplap.

    When such original planking comes from a remodel or renovation, its historical and design value includes nail holes and even slight pest damage (provided the worm, carpenter ant, or termite is long gone). The most common look is a white paint mimicking whitewash, but other colors create perfectly acceptable looks as well.

    Shiplap versus tongue-and-groove: Unlike shiplap where each plank sets atop the other, tongue and groove joints interlock, making them useful for vertical as well as horizontal applications. Examples of tongue-and-groove include original beadboard and knotty-pine paneling applications as well. These choices offer a similar look and may fit your country or farmhouse-style too. Modern beadboard comes in full four-by-eight sheets making installation simpler than shiplap or tongue-and-groove.

    Check out your local DIY retailer for more accessible alternatives to give you that coveted historic look.




    Categories: interior design   DIY   design tips