Classic Properties REALTORS ®



Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 3/17/2019

If you receive an offer to purchase your house, determining how to proceed with this proposal sometimes can be difficult. Ultimately, a home seller needs to weigh the pros and cons of accepting an offer to purchase. And if the pros outweigh the cons, it probably is a good idea to accept the homebuying proposal.

When it comes to reviewing an offer to purchase, there are many reasons why a seller should accept this proposal, and these include:

1. An offer to purchase matches or exceeds a home seller's expectations.

If a home seller receives an offer to purchase at or above the initial asking price for his or her house, accepting the proposal likely is a no-brainer. In fact, a seller may want to provide an instant "Yes" to this offer so he or she can quickly move on to the next step of the property selling journey.

Of course, it helps to establish realistic home selling expectations before listing a residence. If a seller sets a competitive initial asking price that corresponds to his or her home selling expectations, then this individual may be better equipped than others to enjoy a seamless property selling experience.

2. An offer to purchase falls in line with the current housing market's conditions.

If you're selling a home in a buyer's market, you may pounce at the opportunity to accept any offer to purchase that comes your way. Comparatively, if you list your house in a seller's market, you may need to consider all of your options closely before you accept an offer to purchase.

As a home seller, you should evaluate the current state of the real estate market. If you allocate time and resources to learn about the housing market, you can gain real estate market insights to help you determine whether to accept an offer to purchase.

3. An offer to purchase enables a home seller to speed up the property selling process.

If you're operating on a tight home selling timeline, you may be more inclined than ever before to accept an offer to purchase, even if it falls below your initial expectations. Conversely, if you plan ahead for the home selling journey, you may reduce the risk of facing a time crunch to sell your house.

For home sellers, hiring a real estate agent is key. This housing market professional can help a seller prepare for the real estate market and ensure that a seller sets a competitive price for his or her house. Plus, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open house events to showcase a residence to prospective buyers. And if a seller receives an offer to purchase, a real estate agent can provide a recommendation about the best way to respond to this homebuying proposal.

Ready to add your house to the real estate market? Collaborate with a real estate agent, and you can boost the likelihood of getting an offer to purchase your home that allows you to maximize the value of your property.





Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 3/15/2019

This Condo in Norwood, MA recently sold for $244,000. This style home was sold by - Classic Properties REALTORS ®.


9 Endicott Street, Norwood, MA 02062

Condo

$235,000
Price
$244,000
Sale Price

4
Rooms
2
Beds
1
Baths
Great opportunity to live in a centrally located condo in Norwood. Cozy and bright 2 bedroom home featuring glistening hardwood and tiled floors. Updated kitchen with newer cherry cabinets, stone counter top, tiled floor and plenty of room for a dining table. Bathroom with a tiled whirlpool and shower. Spacious bedrooms with plenty of closet space and large windows. Located on southeast side of building. Close to shopping plaza with supermarket and gym. Close to commuter rail station and highway. 2 assigned tandem parking spaces. Condo is ready to go and move-in condition. No showings until the Open House: Sunday, February 10th: 11:30 - 1:00pm. Seller makes no representations as to veracity of attached documents, all provided for convenience only. Buyer(s) to do due diligence.

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Tags: Real estate   Condo   Norwood   02062  
Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 3/10/2019

If your children's playroom is also the guest room or family room or office, you need lots of organization to keep all its uses available at a moment's notice. But busting your budget for fancy boxes and bins is entirely out of the question. A quick trip to the dollar store offers up a trove of options to fit your needs.• Use shower caddies to hold toys and craft items.

  • Plastic bins work great to organize blocks, Legos, and other building pieces.
  • Small bins separate pens, pencils, crayons, glue sticks, and brushes from other supplies.
  • Over-the-door shoe holders hold action figures, fashion dolls or dolls’ dresses.
  • Large tubs make great homes for stuffed animals.
  • Square cubby bins hold dress-up clothes and costumes.
  • Plastic crates make an excellent home for play kitchen sets and dishes. Hang smaller containers on removable hooks alongside the play kitchen.
  • Place a hanging organizer in the closet and fill it with games.
  • Keep color books or comic books in magazine boxes.

Often, baskets and bins come in matching or contrasting color groups. If they are visible in the room, mix and match the larger items artfully on shelving or along the wall, under a table that doubles as a desk or in a closet. Stack lidded bins to keep them organized and label them to make putting items away easier. All these containers are easy grab-and-go items when you need to switch your room's use.

If you’re setting up a play place for grandchildren, fill the baskets and bins with a variety of color books, crayons, and games. Keep a stock of small toys and make each visit special by offering up a new surprise. Then, when the grandchildren are away, whisk the bins into a cabinet or under a bed and, voila, you have your office or guest room back. 

As children mature and move on to crafts and hobbies, add a magnetic spice rack to hold beads and baubles, model parts, and other small objects. Place a clear strip of tape on each container and write on it with a permanent marker, so you know what's in it. If you change out the contents, peel off the tape and add a new piece with the new label.

When they reach the age they no longer need a playroom, re-purpose the bins into a homework station to hold pens, tape, paper, and notebooks.

If you’ve always wanted a dedicated playroom in your home, your realtor can show you homes that fill the bill.




Categories: Family   playroom   organization  


Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 3/3/2019

If you’re like many families, you never seem to have quite enough space for each family member to spread out. To stay within your budget, or maybe to create a more close-knit family you have two or more children sharing a room. As time goes on sharing personal space can create rifts between siblings. To avoid added stress and tension consider employing some shared space solutions to help your family members establish their own space, even in a shared room. Here are some divided ideas to get you started.

Mirroring setup – A simple solution is to just split the room right down the middle. Create mirroring layouts on either side of a shared dresser or desk-space and allow each child to spread out on their half. 

Curtain Wall — You can also divide the room with an actual curtain or screen. A weighted curtain hanging through the center serves as a visual barrier and helps create a sound barrier as well.

Lofted bed — Purchase a pair of lofted beds with built-in desk space underneath. Each child can build out their area and have a place to go that is entirely their own. As children age, you can even install curtains across the bottom of the loft to give them more privacy. 

Divide the closet — Children commonly fight about a sibling's belongings finding their way into their space. This issue is especially true when it comes to closet space. Make sure you establish a separation of closet and storage space (and bathroom if they're sharing one) to help your kids protect their belongings and feel that their stuff is indeed theirs. 

Wireless Headphones — Without purchasing furniture or shelving, you can give your kids a sense of personal space by merely providing them with a way to block out the activities of other family members. Get each of your children a pair of wireless headphones so they can enjoy their music, audio-book or phone entertainment without disturbing each other.

Hold Children Accountable for their space. Separately. — Your daughters might share a room, but both may not be equally at fault for the clutter or lack of cleanliness. A benefit of delineating a separation between their spaces is that it helps you see what each of them is doing, individually. Hold the messy child responsible for their half of the room and positively reinforce the child who is completing their chores. 

Though they might think it so, children to do not need their own rooms to be happy. Learning to share smaller spaces can help your family grow closer. You have to learn more about each other, pay attention to preferences and pet peeves and generally learn to give and take on a more regular basis. Start your kids on the right path to personal growth and family unity by establishing their individual areas and responsibility versus shared family space.




Tags: bedroom   children   family home  
Categories: children   bedroom   family home  


Posted by Classic Properties REALTORS ® on 2/24/2019

Whether you're an active senior or have a mobile job, heading to warmer climes in the winter, or cooler temperatures in the summer offers unique challenges and advantages. Buying a second home in your favorite locale, rather than living in an RV or rental, could be the perfect decision for you.

Be close to family

When your adult children take jobs that move them across the country, looking for a second home to spend time nearby—to see those grandchildren, for example—for holidays, the summers, and other special times makes perfect sense. After all, just because you want to be close by sometimes doesn’t mean you want to be there full-time.

Eventually, however, you may want to relocate near to family permanently as you age and find travel between your homes cumbersome. If you purchase your snowbird home with the future in mind—being mindful of stairs, access to exceptional healthcare and other age-related issues—your transition to living there full time will be smoother. 

Be fiscally astute

Second homes in tax-advantaged areas—states that do not have an income tax—may reduce your tax liability. Several states including Alaska, Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, and Wyoming fall into this category. In addition to income tax savings, some areas have a lower property tax than others. The savings on property tax in one state might offset its income tax and vice versa. Before buying property in one of these states for tax advantages, speak with a qualified tax consultant about how it might affect your bottom line.

Be investment wise

One question you may have about a second home is “Can I earn income with it when I’m not using it?” The answer is “yes” and “no.” Online rental portals make the idea of a holiday rental more attractive than when you marketed it with a For Rent sign in the window. But, they don’t always make enough to pay for themselves. Coveted rentals in holiday destinations have high seasons, low seasons, inclement weather, and generally off years and the cost of maintenance and turnover between renters, general repairs and damages might outweigh the value. Unless you intend to rent out your property during the high season, which means you can’t use it then for yourself, you might make enough to break even, but most experts warn that your holiday rental income may not cover your mortgage. If you decide to rent your snowbird home, don't rely on the property to pay for itself.

If you've seriously considered buying a second home and wonder about the advantages and disadvantages, consult a local real estate expert for information on second homes in your desired location.




Categories: homebuyers   retirement